Frequent question: What are the 5 official languages of South Africa?

The official languages of the Republic are Pedi, Sotho, Tswana, Swati, Venḓa, Tsonga, Afrikaans, English, Ndebele, Xhosa and Zulu.

What are the 11 official languages of South Africa?

Generally considered to be among the most multilingual countries in the world and among the most multiethnic in Africa, post-apartheid South Africa has 11 official languages recognized in its democratic constitution: English, Afrikaans, Xhosa, Ndebele, Zulu, Tswana, Swati, Sotho, Southern Sotho, Venda and Tsonga.

What are the top 3 languages spoken in South Africa?

IsiZulu is South Africa’s biggest language, spoken by almost a quarter (23%) of the population. Our other official languages are isiXhosa (spoken by 16%), Afrikaans (13.5%), English (10%), Sesotho sa Leboa (9%), Setswana and Sesotho (both 8%), Xitsonga (4.5%), siSwati and Tshivenda (both 2.5%), and isiNdebele (2%).

Is Afrikaans a white language?

Afrikaans was constructed as a “white language”, with a “white history” and “white faces”.

What language do black South African speak?

Home languages of black South Africans

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A total of 11.5-million black South Africans speak isiZulu as a first language, or about three in 10 (28.5%) black people. Next up is isiXhosa, the first language of 8.1-million black South Africans, spoken at home by two in every 10 (20.1%) black people.

How do you say hello in South Africa language?

South Africa

  1. Zulu: Sawubona (Hello)
  2. Xhosa: Molo (Hello)
  3. Afrikaans: Hallo (Hello)
  4. English: Hello.

26.11.2019

Which language is mostly spoken in South Africa?

The most common language spoken as a first language by South Africans is Zulu (23 percent), followed by Xhosa (16 percent), and Afrikaans (14 percent). English is the fourth most common first language in the country (9.6%), but is understood in most urban areas and is the dominant language in government and the media.

Is Afrikaans a dying language in South Africa?

The Afrikaans language is one of South Africa’s official languages and a large proportion of the local population uses it as their first or second language. It is still taught in schools. … Some believe that Afrikaans is a dying language, however, it remains spoken all over the country and respected for its origins.

What do they eat in South Africa?

Don’t leave South Africa without eating:

  • Biltong & droewors. Dry curing was a method used to preserve meat by the indigenous tribes of South Africa before fridges were invented. …
  • Boerewors. …
  • Cape Malay curry. …
  • Malva pudding. …
  • Chakalaka & pap. …
  • Braai/Shisa nyama. …
  • Bunny chow. …
  • Amarula Don Pedro.

What is the most difficult language in South Africa?

Taa, the last vital language of the Tuu language family and formerly called ʻSouthern Khoisan’, it is believed to be the world’s most difficult language. Part of the Khoisan language group and is spoken in the Kalahari Desert of Southern Africa, it is also known as !

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Did Coloureds invent Afrikaans?

Historically, it has been acknowledged that coloured people were integral to the creation of creole language that mixed Dutch, Malay languages and African languages which came to be known as Afrikaans. … The ancestors of coloured people were amongst the first to create the new language, Afrikaans.

Who speaks Afrikaans?

Afrikaans
Native to South Africa, Namibia
Ethnicity Afrikaners Basters Cape Coloureds Cape Malay Griqua
Native speakers 7.2 million (2016) 10.3 million L2 speakers in South Africa (2002)
Language family Indo-European Germanic West Germanic Weser-Rhine Germanic Low Franconian Dutch (Hollandic dialect) Afrikaans

Who spoke Afrikaans first?

Afrikaans language, also called Cape Dutch, West Germanic language of South Africa, developed from 17th-century Dutch, sometimes called Netherlandic, by the descendants of European (Dutch, German, and French) colonists, indigenous Khoisan peoples, and African and Asian slaves in the Dutch colony at the Cape of Good …

Is Dutch dying?

No, Dutch is not a dying language. As a matter of fact, it is alive and well and living in English, which is the lowest common denominator of the Germanic languages, and which 1,000 years ago was about fifty percent Dutch. … They think that Dutch is a foreign language.

What is the youngest language in the world?

Rich in idiom and emotion, Afrikaans was born 340 years ago in the homes of South Africa’s white Dutch, German and French settlers. Not only is it the world’s youngest national language, it is one of the smallest, with just 13 million speakers.

Is Afrikaans in danger of dying out?

Unfortunately its true Afrikaans is dying out as the majority of South African refuse to speak Afrikaans. Because before 1994 we had a different ruling party called, The National Party.

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Hai Afrika!