You asked: Who was the first European to cross the African continent Benjamin Disraeli?

It was David Livingstone who was the first to cross the African continent.

Who was the first European to cross Africa?

Portuguese explorer Prince Henry, known as the Navigator, was the first European to methodically explore Africa and the oceanic route to the Indies. From his residence in the Algarve region of southern Portugal, he directed successive expeditions to circumnavigate Africa and reach India.

Who named a country after himself Cecil Rhodes Benjamin Disraeli?

Cecil Rhodes named Rhodesia after himself. Rhodesia is now known as Zimbabwe.

Who was an English businessman who lived in southern Africa?

Cecil Rhodes was a English businessman who livedin southern Africa.

Who encouraged British imperialism?

Answer: The right answer is Cecil Rhodes. Explanation: His full names is Cecil John Rhodes.

Who first colonized Africa?

By 1900 much of Africa had been colonized by seven European powers—Britain, France, Germany, Belgium, Spain, Portugal, and Italy. After the conquest of African decentralized and centralized states, the European powers set about establishing colonial state systems.

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What is the oldest civilization in Africa?

Africa’s first great civilization emerged in ancient Egypt in c. 3400 BC. Carthage was founded by Phoenicians in the 9th century BC. Ancient civilization, based around the River Nile in Egypt, which emerged 5,000 years ago and reached its peak in the 16th century BC.

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Who authorized the attack on Boer territories?

Cecil Rhodes was the one who authorized an attacl on Boer territories.

Who was a Scottish missionary and explorer?

David Livingstone, (born March 19, 1813, Blantyre, Lanarkshire, Scotland—died May 1, 1873, Chitambo [now in Zambia]), Scottish missionary and explorer who exercised a formative influence on Western attitudes toward Africa.

Who was an English businessman who lived in southern Africa Cecil Rhodes Benjamin Disraeli David Livingstone?

Cecil John Rhodes PC (5 July 1853 – 26 March 1902) was a British businessman, mining magnate and politician in southern Africa who served as Prime Minister of the Cape Colony from 1890 to 1896.

Who were Boers?

Page 3 – The Boers

The term Boer, derived from the Afrikaans word for farmer, was used to describe the people in southern Africa who traced their ancestry to Dutch, German and French Huguenot settlers who arrived in the Cape of Good Hope from 1652.

Who successfully led an African tribes fight against British colonizers?

One of the chiefs who organised an armed rebellion against British colonial authority was Zulu Chief Bambatha.

Who won the Boer War?

South African War, also called Boer War, Second Boer War, or Anglo-Boer War; to Afrikaners, also called Second War of Independence, war fought from October 11, 1899, to May 31, 1902, between Great Britain and the two Boer (Afrikaner) republics—the South African Republic (Transvaal) and the Orange Free State—resulting …

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Why was England so powerful?

Why was Britain/UK/England so powerful? Sea power, merchants, and luck. … The more money came into Britain, the more money they could put into their navy, which then could protect the trade lanes, allowing more trade, which meant more money.

How did Britain rule the world?

At its height it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power. By 1913 the British Empire held sway over 412 million people, 23 per cent of the world population at the time, and by 1920 it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi), 24 percent of the Earth’s total land area.

How many countries are still under British rule?

Today, the United Kingdom consists of four constituent countries, and it is responsible for three crown dependencies and fourteen overseas territories, although the legacy of the British Empire can still be seen, and it’s impact will be felt for centuries to come.

Hai Afrika!