When was Kenya first discovered?

The earliest inhabitants of Kenya were hunter-gatherers but from about 2,000 BC herders came to the region. Then from about 800 AD Arabs sailed to Kenya. Some settled and intermarried and they created the Swahili culture along the coast. The first European to reach Kenya was Vasco da Gama in 1498.

What was Kenya before 1920?

The Colony and Protectorate of Kenya, commonly known as British Kenya, was part of the British Empire in Africa. It was established when the former East Africa Protectorate was transformed into a British Crown colony in 1920.

What was Kenya called before 1963?

British Kenya (1920-1963) Pre-Crisis Phase (July 23, 1920-September 25, 1952): Kenya (part of the British East Africa Protectorate) was declared a British colony on July 23, 1920. Major-General Sir Edward Northey was appointed as the first Governor of the British colony of Kenya.

When was Kenya founded?

How did Kenya became a country?

On December 12, 1963, Kenya declares its independence from Britain. The East African nation is freed from its colonial oppressors, but its struggle for democracy is far from over. A decade before, in 1952, a rebellion known the Mau Mau Uprising had shaken the British colony.

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What was the old name of Kenya?

Kenya was initially known as the British East Africa Protectorate, or British East Africa and it was not until 1920 that it was officially named Kenya. Parts of history has it that the name Kenya was coined from the Kamba language pronunciation of Mt Kenya’s traditional name, Kirinyaga and Kinyaa.

Who named Kenya?

Etymology. The Republic of Kenya is named after Mount Kenya. The earliest recorded version of the modern name was written by German explorer Johann Ludwig Krapf in the 19th century.

What was Kenya like before colonization?

Prior to the arrival of Arab settlers, the area in East Africa known today as Kenya was predominately populated by farmers and herders, many of who had migrated from nearby regions.

Why did the British want Kenya?

The British colonized Kenya for economic considerations and for increased power. The British saw Kenya as a potential source of wealth. … The British also saw colonizing Kenya as a way to get more power. They felt it would give them more prestige in their competition with other European powers.

Why did Britain leave Kenya?

Independence and reparations

The Mau Mau uprising convinced the British of the need for reform in Kenya and the wheels were set in motion for the transition to independence. On 12 December 1963 Kenya became an independent nation under the Kenya Independence Act.

Is Kenya a second world country?

Yes, Kenya is a third world country. While the country has recently gotten lower-middle-income stature, not every Kenyan has benefited from the heightened wealth.

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What is Kenya most known for?

Kenya, country in East Africa famed for its scenic landscapes and vast wildlife preserves. Its Indian Ocean coast provided historically important ports by which goods from Arabian and Asian traders have entered the continent for many centuries.

Who Colonised Kenya?

The British East African Company was granted a charter in 1888, which led to the colonization of present day Kenya.

What country was before Kenya?

From 1895 until 1963, the area that later became modern Kenya was under British colonial rule as part of British East Africa. In 1998, the American Embassy in Kenya’s capital city Nairobi was the target of a terrorist bombing that killed 12 U.S. citizens, 32 Foreign Service Nationals (FSNs), and 247 Kenyan citizens.

How was Kenya affected by colonialism?

Great Britain’s colonization in Kenya affected the country’s religion and culture, education, and government. European colonization in Kenya had a large impact on Africa’s religion and culture. Africa had over 100 ethnic groups in which were effected from the colonization.

Where did slaves from Kenya go?

“They were captured in Tanzania, Malawi, Southern Rhodesia [now Zimbabwe] and Northern Rhodesia [now Zambia] and they were taken to Zanzibar to be sold. Mombasa was a route for them to pass through,” Haywood told DW.

Hai Afrika!